IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ] Print this page

BFTDK: Decadal tracking of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna
Citation
Aarestrup, K. 2018. Decadal tracking of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna
Contact: Aarestrup, Kim ;

Availability: Creative Commons License This dataset is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Description
In 1930-50 bluefin tuna were commertially fished in Denmark and Sweeden, but catches gradually dissapear in the next decades. Same happened to sport fishing. After decades of absence, bluefin tuna have recently been sighted again in the Northeastern Atlantic, inter alia off the coast of Bohuslän and in the Skagerrak and Kattegat. In 2016 and 2017, large schools of several hundred large individuals were observed. These adult fish hunted mackerel and herring during late summer and autumn. The reasons for the return and origin of the bluefin tuna in the North Sea-Skagerrak-Kattegat are unknown. This project will use electronic tags to help understand its migration patterns and behavior, avoid unwanted bycatch and support sustainable management of the stock. Attaching long life acoustic tags holds the potential to observe transatlantic migration as well as repeatability of the migratory pattern, by using the OTN network of receivers. more

In 1930-1950, bluefin tuna were commercially fished in Denmark and Sweden. Landings were several hundred tonnes per year, with a peak of 2000t in Sweden in 1942. Fishing continued in the next two decades and then it gradually disappeared. Sport fishing for bluefin tuna in the Kattegat and the Sound continued until the 1960s. But then, bluefin tuna catches became increasingly rare. After decades of absence, bluefin tuna have recently been sighted again in the Northeastern Atlantic, inter alia off the coast of Bohuslän and in the Skagerrak and Kattegat. In 2016 and 2017, large schools of several hundred large individuals were observed. These adult fish hunted mackerel and herring during late summer and autumn. The reasons for the return and origin of the bluefin tuna in the North Sea-Skagerrak-Kattegat are unknown. This project will use electronic tags to help understand its migration patterns and behavior, avoid unwanted bycatch and support sustainable management of the stock. Attaching long life acoustic tags holds the potential to observe transatlantic migration as well as repeatability of the migratory pattern, by using the OTN network of receivers.

Scope
Themes:
Biology, Biology > Ecology - biodiversity, Biology > Fish, Fisheries > Fish stocks/catches/taggings
Keywords:
Marine, Acoustic data, Acoustic telemetry, Bluefin, Bluefin tuna, Commercial fishing, Fish behaviour, Fish migration, Fisheries Management, Kattegat S, Migration patterns, Migrations, North sea, Northeast atlantic, Ocean migration, Sport fishing, Swedish skagerrak coast, Tracking, Tuna fisheries, ANE, Sweden, Pisces, Scombridae Rafinesque, 1815, Thunnus South, 1845, Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844)

Geographical coverage
ANE, Sweden Stations [Marine Regions]
Bohuslän
Skagerrak
Kattegat

Temporal coverage
From 24 August 2018 on [In Progress]

Taxonomic coverage
Pisces [WoRMS]
Scombridae Rafinesque, 1815 [WoRMS]
Thunnus South, 1845 [WoRMS]
Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844) [WoRMS]

Parameter
Fish detections Methodology
Fish detections: Acoustic telemetry

Contributor
Technical University of Denmark; National Institute of Aquatic Resources (DTU Aqua), more

Related datasets
Parent dataset:
ETN data: fish acoustic receiver network, more


Dataset status: In Progress
Data type: Data
Data origin: Research: field survey
Metadatarecord created: 2021-09-10
Information last updated: 2021-11-25
All data in the Integrated Marine Information System (IMIS) is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy