IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Print this page

Do season and habitat influence the behaviour of Haflinger mares in a coastal dune area?
Lamoot, I.; Hoffmann, M. (2004). Do season and habitat influence the behaviour of Haflinger mares in a coastal dune area?, in: Lamoot, I. Foraging behaviour and habitat use of large herbivores in coastal dune landscape = Foerageergedrag en habitatgebruik van grote herbivoren in een kustduinlandschap. pp. 37-53
In: Lamoot, I. (2004). Foraging behaviour and habitat use of large herbivores in coastal dune landscape = Foerageergedrag en habitatgebruik van grote herbivoren in een kustduinlandschap. PhD Thesis. Instituut voor Natuur- en Bosonderzoek: Brussel. ISBN 90-403-2047-2. 246 pp., more
Related to:
Lamoot, I.; Hoffmann, M. (2004). Do season and habitat influence the behaviour of Haflinger mares in a coastal dune area? Belg. J. Zool. 134(2/1): 97-103, more

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Equestrian > Horses
    Grazing behaviour
    Horses
    Mammals > Ungulates > Mammals > Perissodactyla > Equidae > Equus > Meat animals > Working animals > Livestock > Horses
    Belgium, Belgian Coast [Marine Regions]
    Marine

Authors  Top 

Abstract
    This study was performed to gain more knowledge about the behaviour and habitat use of Haflinger mares, free-ranging in a low-productivity dune area. Detailed data on these animals' time budgets were collected over a full year, through the focal animal observation technique. On average the Haflinger horses spent 68% of the daytime grazing, 18% resting and 8% walking. Seasonal features influenced horses' behaviour, mainly through a change in grazing time. Shorter grazing time in summer allowed the animals to rest longer than during the other seasons. We suggest that especially the decreased forage quality and quantity of the grazed habitats in the non- growing season account for the increased grazing time in autumn and winter. In all four seasons the horses preferred grazing in the grassy habitat. However, habitat use showed seasonal variation. Grey dunes were grazed more intensively in winter and spring, compared to summer and autumn. The contribution of roughage, scrub and woodland to the habitat use was low over the entire year. For several response variables the observed variation could be partly explained by the differences between individual animals.

All data in the Integrated Marine Information System (IMIS) is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors