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What conservation stake for the sandmanson worm (Lanice conchilega) clusters?
Godet, L.; Toupoint, N.; Bonin, A.; Olivier, F.; Fournier, J.; Retière, C. (2006). What conservation stake for the sandmanson worm (Lanice conchilega) clusters?, in: Tubielewicz, A. (Ed.) Living marine resources and coastal habitats. EuroCoast - Littoral 2006, : pp. 9-17
In: Tubielewicz, A. (Ed.) (2006). Living marine resources and coastal habitats. EuroCoast - Littoral 2006. Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology: Gdansk. ISBN 83-88617-87-7. 161 pp., more
In: EuroCoast - Littoral 2006. Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology: Gdnask, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings E [103362]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Conservation; Lanice conchilega (Pallas, 1766) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Godet, L.
  • Toupoint, N.
  • Bonin, A.
  • Olivier, F.
  • Fournier, J.
  • Retière, C.

Abstract
    The sandmason worm (Lanice conchilega, Annelid polychaete, Pallas 1766) ranges widely along European seashores. Locally very abundant, this 'engineer species' is known to locally increase biodiversity, and could play a crucial role in trophic networks. Sandmason worms have high water filtration potential, and the clusters that they constitute are attractive feeding grounds for birds (waders and gulls) and fishes (especially flat fishes). By the example of the Chausey Archipelago and the Bay of the Mont Saint-Michel (France), we propose a conceptual approach to evaluate the conservation stakes of these habitats. On the study sites, this habitat turns out to be not only one of the richest in terms of raw biological diversity, but also one of the most attractive habitats for birds. Furthermore, they may have an important socio-economic value. The conservation stakes of sandmason worm habitats, which are sensitive and have heritage interest, is discussed within the context of an integrated and sustainable coastal management policy. The issue is even more pressing when one considers that these habitats still do not benefit from any legal protection.

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