IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Nutrient depletions in the Ross Sea and their relation with pigment stocks
Goeyens, L.; Elskens, M.; Catalano, G.; Lipizer, M.; Hecq, J.H.; Goffart, A. (2000). Nutrient depletions in the Ross Sea and their relation with pigment stocks, in: Goffart, A. et al. (Ed.) Hydrodynamical and Ecosystem Processes in Ice-covered Seas of the Southern and Northern Hemispheres. Journal of Marine Systems, 27(Special Issue 1-3): pp. 195-208. dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0924-7963(00)00067-1
In: Goffart, A.; Hecq, J.H. (Ed.) (2000). Hydrodynamical and Ecosystem Processes in Ice-covered Seas of the Southern and Northern Hemispheres. Journal of Marine Systems, 27(Special Issue 1-3). Elsevier: Liège. 1-276 pp., more
In: Journal of Marine Systems. Elsevier: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; Amsterdam. ISSN 0924-7963, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 103860 [ OMA ]

Keywords
Author keywords
    Ross Sea; nutrient depletions; phytopigments

Authors  Top 
  • Goeyens, L., more
  • Elskens, M., more
  • Catalano, G.
  • Lipizer, M.
  • Hecq, J.H., more
  • Goffart, A., more

Abstract
    The present article depicts a first attempt to relate the governing nutrient uptake regime and phytopigment signature of the Ross Sea. Based on nutrient and phytopigment data obtained during two cruises in the Ross Sea, two distinct groups were recognised. The first one was characterised by moderate nutrient (nitrate and silicic acid) depletions in combination with relatively high diatom and Phaeocystis abundance. The second group showed very low nutrient depletions and very poor diatom abundance. Average depth specific nitrate depletions were 8.1 and 1.1 µM and average silicic acid depletions were 21.5 and 1.3 µM, respectively. The nutrient consumption patterns did not match the conditions of silicic acid excess (SEA) or nitrate excess areas (NEA), a clear trend being probably obscured by very poor seasonal maturity of several sampling stations. The contrast between both groups is largely explained by small differences in nitrogen uptake regime of the major phytoplankters. During early season, the diatoms meet the majority of their nitrogen requirements by nitrate uptake, with few exceptions where ammonium is the most important nitrogenous substrate. On average, their nitrate uptake capacity is lower than that of Phaeocystis (average specific nitrate uptake rates were 0.021 and 0.036 day-1 for diatoms and Phaeocystis, respectively). The latter phytoplankton always shows predominance of nitrate uptake. Both groups are subject to inhibition of nitrate uptake when ammonium availability increases, and it is likely that the diatoms are more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of ammonium.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors