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Vervuilen loont: organisatie van internationale scheepvaart stimuleert milieuvervuiling op zee
Harjono, M.; Leemans, E. (2003). Vervuilen loont: organisatie van internationale scheepvaart stimuleert milieuvervuiling op zee. Justitiële verkenn. 29(2): 58-70
In: Justitiële verkenningen: documentatieblad van het Ministerie van Justitie. Boom: Den Haag; Deventer; Arnhem; 's-Gravenhage. ISSN 0167-5850, more

Also published as
  • Harjono, M.; Leemans, E. (2003). Vervuilen loont: organisatie van internationale scheepvaart stimuleert milieuvervuiling op zee, in: Scheepmaker, M.P.C. et al. (Ed.) Criminaliteit op zee. Justitiële verkenningen: documentatieblad van het Ministerie van Justitie, 29(2): pp. 58-70, more

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Harjono, M.
  • Leemans, E.

Abstract
    Discharges of toxic substances from ships, oil tanker disasters and overfishing cause great environmental harm to the world’s oceans and coasts. The companies causing damage to the environment are not being held accountable for their devastating practices. In many cases a company benefits from bringing harm to the marine environment. And in any case it usually does not lead to disadvantages for the polluting party. A mixture of elements such as basic principles applied in the shipping world (notably mare liberum or the right of free passage), and the slim chances of getting caught while polluting, makes this an enduring situation. A major obstacle is that the United Nations International Maritime Organisation (IMO) is not able to ensure an effective protection of the marine environment. Economic forces which automatically maintain the status quo of marine pollution dominate the IMO. As long as the IMO is in the stranglehold of the flags of convenience states, the oceans and coastlines will suffer from the malpractices of unscrupulous ship owners, agents and cargo owners. Radical changes in the fundaments of international maritime law are a prerequisite to solving these problems. In addition, European co-operation that gives priority to the protection of the marine environment may well be the best way to change current polluting practices.

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