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Production and economic return of shrimp aquaculture in coastal ponds of different sizes and with different management regimes
Islam, Md. S.; Milstein, A.; Wahab, M.A.; Kamal, A.H.M.; Dewan, S. (2005). Production and economic return of shrimp aquaculture in coastal ponds of different sizes and with different management regimes. Aquacult. Int. 13(6): 489-500. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10499-005-9000-7
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Economic benefits; Ponds; Production cost; Penaeus monodon Fabricius, 1798 [WoRMS]; ISW, Bangladesh [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Islam, Md. S.
  • Milstein, A.
  • Wahab, M.A.
  • Kamal, A.H.M.
  • Dewan, S.

Abstract
    Coastal shrimp (Penaeus monodon) aquaculture in Bangladesh is mostly practiced in a special type of field/pond situated by the side of a river -- called a Gher -- that is used to cultivate rice in winter and shrimp in summer. Ghers of different sizes are managed in different ways. In order to understand the effects of Gher size and their corresponding management practices on the production and economic returns of shrimp farming, we conducted an on-farm study in three small (1–5 ha), three medium (6–10 ha) and three large (>10 ha) Ghers located in the coastal Southwest region of Bangladesh. The mean harvest weight of shrimp was similar in all Ghers, but survival rates were higher in the small (50%) and medium (37%) ones than in the large (18%) ones. The high mortality in the large units led to a production that was lower than one-half of that in the small Ghers (about 80 and 200 kg/ha, respectively). The total variable costs per unit area were similar in all Ghers, but the importance of different items varied with Gher size. In the small Ghers, there are relatively high investments on inputs and labor. This expenditure results in lower shrimp mortality and higher production, which in turn results in gross returns that are larger than the total costs -- hence, a positive and high net return. In large Ghers, the fixed costs are larger than in the small ones simply because of the size of the pond. Variable costs include higher investments in post-larvae and labor than in small Ghers, and lower inputs applied only at pond preparation. This results in higher shrimp mortality and lower production, which in turn results in gross returns that are smaller than the total costs -- hence, a negative or low net return. These findings have positive implications for the future policy formulation of coastal shrimp aquaculture in Bangladesh.

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