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Archaeological object detection under water
van den Brenk, S.; van Mierlo, B. (2006). Archaeological object detection under water, in: Evolutions in hydrography, 6th - 9th November 2006, Provincial House Antwerp, Belgium: Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of the International Federation of Hydrographic Societies. Special Publication (Hydrographic Society), 55: pp. 102-105
In: (2006). Evolutions in hydrography, 6th - 9th November 2006, Provincial House Antwerp, Belgium: Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of the International Federation of Hydrographic Societies. Special Publication of the Hydrographic Society, 55. International Federation of Hydrographic Society: London. 234 + cd-rom pp., more
In: Special Publication (Hydrographic Society). Hydrographic Society: London. ISSN 0309-8303, more

Available in  Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Archaeology; Detection; Multibeam sonar; Side scan sonar; ANE, Netherlands, Meuse R., Barrage Grave; ANE, Netherlands, Meuse R., Barrage Sambeek; Brackish water; Fresh water

Authors  Top 
  • van den Brenk, S.
  • van Mierlo, B.

Abstract
    In 2006 the Valletta treaty (see appendix) has been implemented in The Netherlands. Since then, preservation of subacqueous archaeological heritage has become responsibility of the constructor. This requires a cost-effective procedure to detect and identify objects under water, in order to distinguish between archaeological and non-archaeological objects on the one hand, and between critical and noncritical obstacles to construction on the other. The IMAGO project showed that there isn’t one geophysical technique to achieve this goal, but that a combination of techniques is required. Moreover, a desk study is the most efficient way of planning the procedure to be followed. The project of Barrages Grave and Sambeek was a test case of the IMAGO conclusions and it demonstrates that the strategy set out in the desk study was adequate. A combination of sidescan sonar survey, multibeam bathymetry and dive inspections was efficient. The result was 4 historical shipwrecks varying from midthirtheenth, through late sixteenth to early twentieth century.

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