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Innovative dredging in the port of Rotterdam
Cornelissen, S. (2006). Innovative dredging in the port of Rotterdam, in: Evolutions in hydrography, 6th - 9th November 2006, Provincial House Antwerp, Belgium: Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of the International Federation of Hydrographic Societies. Special Publication (Hydrographic Society), 55: pp. 145-148
In: (2006). Evolutions in hydrography, 6th - 9th November 2006, Provincial House Antwerp, Belgium: Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of the International Federation of Hydrographic Societies. Special Publication of the Hydrographic Society, 55. International Federation of Hydrographic Society: London. 234 + cd-rom pp., more
In: Special Publication (Hydrographic Society). Hydrographic Society: London. ISSN 0309-8303, more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Dredging; Innovations; ANE, Netherlands, Rotterdam Harbour [Marine Regions]; Marine

Author  Top 
  • Cornelissen, S.

Abstract
    A large part of the maintenance dredging costs in the Port of Rotterdam is determined by the long transit time between the dredging site and the disposal site at sea. The Port of Rotterdam Authority has been looking at several innovative methods of maintenance dredging, with the intention of cutting down the necessary transport volume. One of the methods considered is agitation dredging. Dredged material is released from the dredge hopper during favourable tidal or river flow, with the intention of transporting the material on the currents away from the dredge site toward sea. In cooperation with Environmental Tracing Systems Ltd the Port of Rotterdam Authority performed a silt tracer sediment transport study in order to determine the efficiency of the agitation dredging. The dispersion of dredged material was investigated by sampling the harbour bed and checking the amount of tracer per sample. Mass budget analysis of the retrieved tracer after 7 days shows that approximately 35% of the agitated material settled in the harbour. A remaining 15% of the released tracer was found outside the harbour entrance. The remaining part, adding up to 50%, is assumed to have left the area that was covered by sampling.

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