IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Expected effects of changing seawater temperatures on the geographic distribution of seaweed species
Breeman, A.M. (1990). Expected effects of changing seawater temperatures on the geographic distribution of seaweed species, in: Beukema, J.J. et al. (Ed.) Expected effects of climatic change on marine coastal ecosystems. Developments in Hydrobiology, 57: pp. 69-76
In: Beukema, J.J. et al. (Ed.) (1990). Expected effects of climatic change on marine coastal ecosystems. Developments in Hydrobiology, 57. Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht. ISBN 0-7923-0697-X. 221 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more

Available in  Author 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [10694]

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • Breeman, A.M.

Abstract
    Seaweeds are generally kept within their geographic boundaries by limiting effects of temperature. Northern boundaries are set by low lethal winter temperatures, or by summer temperatures too low for growth and/or reproduction. Southern boundaries are set by high lethal summer temperatures, or by winter temperatures too high for induction of a crucial step in the life cycle. Characteristic thermal response types, as identified patterns in the North Atlantic Ocean. Changes in seawater temperature have therefore easily predictable effects on the geographic distribution of seaweed species. Locally, species composition (and community structure) will be altered. Apart from latitudinal displacement and regional extinction, changing seawater temperatures may also cause a shift in selection pressure at a boundary, particularly when summer and winter temperatures change to a different extent. For instance, southern boundaries of several cold temperate brown algae in Europe, which are presently set by 'winter reproduction' limits will become 'summer lethal' limits following a rise in summer temperatures of only a few degrees. Reconstruction of thermal regimes during glacial and interglacial periods shows that such shifts in selection pressure have probably occurred more often on eastern than on western Atlantic coasts.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author