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Constraints, suggested solutions and an outlook towards a new digital culture for the oceans and beyond: experiences from five predictive GIS models that contribute to global management, conservation and study of marine wildlife and habitat
Huettmann, F. (2007). Constraints, suggested solutions and an outlook towards a new digital culture for the oceans and beyond: experiences from five predictive GIS models that contribute to global management, conservation and study of marine wildlife and habitat, in: Vanden Berghe, E. et al. (Ed.) (2007). Proceedings Ocean Biodiversity Informatics: International Conference on Marine Biodiversity Data Management, Hamburg, Germany 29 November to 1 December, 2004. VLIZ Special Publication, 37: pp. 49-61
In: Vanden Berghe, E. et al. (Ed.) (2007). Proceedings Ocean Biodiversity Informatics: International Conference on Marine Biodiversity Data Management, Hamburg, Germany 29 November to 1 December, 2004. VLIZ Special Publication, 37. BSH/UNESCO/IOC/VLIZ: Paris. VI, 192 pp., more
In: VLIZ Special Publication. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende. ISSN 1377-0950, more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    GIS; Habitat; Marine environment; Modelling; Marine

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  • Huettmann, F.

Abstract
    Marine wildlife and habitat data are increasingly available to the global public for free and via the internet. This 'data explosion' brings change in ocean management and promotes predictive modelling. Predictive modelling using such data and GIS (Geographic Information Systems) has matured as a robust research method, but still does not get used to its full potential. This study reviews experiences and constraints encountered during 5 predictive GIS models representative for the Atlantic and Pacific. It was found that data availability is less of a problem, but data quality still needs to be improved in time and space. Bigger constraints were found with the management and policy implementations of spatial models. A professional attitude towards the free delivery and use of data, and data availability is required. Often, expertise and skill is still missing on how to set up, build, interpret and implement predictive models towards safeguarding marine wildlife and its habitat. It is suggested that the awareness, education and support for data and modelling needs to be further improved in the public, in agencies and among scientists. Using evaluated models should become a legal requirement when dealing with endangered wildlife and habitat of the global village. A change towards a truly digital and transparent administration and culture, based on science-based management and using models for decision-making, is suggested for the oceans and beyond.

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