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Inland hypersaline lakes and the brine shrimp Artemia as simple models for biodiversity analysis at the population level
Gajardo, G.M.; Sorgeloos, P.; Beardmore, J.A. (2006). Inland hypersaline lakes and the brine shrimp Artemia as simple models for biodiversity analysis at the population level. Saline Systems 2(14): 1-5. dx.doi.org/10.1186/1746-1448-2-14
In: Saline Systems. BioMedcentral, more

Also published as
  • Gajardo, G.M.; Sorgeloos, P.; Beardmore, J.A. (2007). Inland hypersaline lakes and the brine shrimp Artemia as simple models for biodiversity analysis at the population level, in: VLIZ Coll. Rep. 35-36(2005-2006). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 35-36: pp. Chapter 44, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 115090 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Marine; Brackish water

Authors  Top 
  • Gajardo, G.M.
  • Sorgeloos, P., more
  • Beardmore, J.A.

Abstract
    Biodiversity can be measured at different hierarchical levels, from genetic diversity within species to diversity of ecosystems, though policy-makers tend to use species richness. The 2010 goal of reducing biodiversity loss, agreed by the subscribers to the Convention on Biological Diversity, requires simple and reliable protocols to evaluate biodiversity at any level in a given ecosystem. Stakeholders, particularly policy makers, need to understand how ecosystem components interact to produce social and economic benefits on the long run, whilst scientists are expected to fulfil this demand by testing and modelling ideally simple (low diversity) ecosystems, and by monitoring key species. This work emphasizes the unique opportunity offered by inland, isolated salt lakes and the brine shrimp Artemia, an example of biodiversity contained at the intra-specific level, as simple models to understand and monitor biodiversity, as well as to assess its predicted positive association with ecosystem stability. In addition to having well identified species and strains and even clones, that allow to test reproductive effects (sexual versus asexual), Artemia benefits from the possibility to set up experimental testing at both laboratory scale and outdoor pond systems, for which a comprehensive cyst bank with sufficient amount of samples from all over the world is available.

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