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Problèmes soulevés par l'utilisation des farines de poisson pour l'alimentation des animaux = Problems related to the utilization of fish meal in animal nutrition
Leroy, A.M. (1962). Problèmes soulevés par l'utilisation des farines de poisson pour l'alimentation des animaux = Problems related to the utilization of fish meal in animal nutrition, in: Heen, E. et al. Fish in nutrition. pp. 312-319
In: Heen, E.; Kreuzer, R. (1962). Fish in nutrition. Fishing News (Books): London. XXIII, 447 pp., more

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    Marine

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  • Leroy, A.M.

Abstract
    The current crisis affecting fish-meal producers is due in the first place to the relatively recent increase in the number of factories producing this commodity, to the competition they are meeting from other animal or vegetable products with a high amino acid content and, lastly, to the difficulties experienced by manufacturers of compound feeds in obtaining meals of consistently good quality. Many commercial fish meals may be poor, due to excessive humidity which gives rise to chemical or microbial changes during storage. Too high mineral and fat contents are incompatible with the desired protein levels. Again, faulty handling, especially overheating in the course of drying, may spoil the available essential amino acids, which are what users of fish meal look for. Insofar as we know, it is possible to assess the quality of a fish meal by a number of chemical or biological tests. Among the former, tests for moisture content, minerals soluble or insoluble in hydrochloric acid, total nitrogen and ether extraction give rise to problems of standardization. For standardization is what is necessary in the findings obtained in different laboratories are to be comparable. The same applies to the determination of ammonia nitrogen. As regards biological tests, those for the content of nitrogen soluble in hydrochloric pepsin and for available lysine (Carpenter test or any other efficient method for the same purpose), and bacterlal counts supplemented by systematic tests for Salmonella pathogens should themselves be standardized. Finally, tests for the possible presence of toxic amines (e.g. tyramine and histamine) would guarantee protection to users against serious defects under this head which would otherwise, even with small amounts, have highly dangerous results.

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