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Do the same sponge species live on both the Caribbean and eastern Pacific sides of the Isthmus of Panama?
Wulff, J.L. (1996). Do the same sponge species live on both the Caribbean and eastern Pacific sides of the Isthmus of Panama?, in: Willenz, Ph. Recent advances in sponge biodiversity inventory and documentation: Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on Atlanto-Mediterranean Sponge Taxonomy, Brussels, April 25-30, 1995. Bulletin van het Koninklijk Belgisch Instituut voor Natuurwetenschappen. Biologie = Bulletin de l'Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique. Biologie, 66(Suppl.): pp. 165-173
In: Willenz, Ph. (1996). Recent advances in sponge biodiversity inventory and documentation: Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on Atlanto-Mediterranean Sponge Taxonomy, Brussels, April 25-30, 1995. Bulletin van het Koninklijk Belgisch Instituut voor Natuurwetenschappen. Biologie = Bulletin de l'Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique. Biologie, 66(Suppl.). Koninklijk Belgisch Instituut voor Natuurwetenschappen: Brussel, Belgium. 242 pp., more
In: Bulletin van het Koninklijk Belgisch Instituut voor Natuurwetenschappen. Biologie = Bulletin de l'Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique. Biologie. Koninklijk Belgisch Instituut voor Natuurwetenschappen: Bruxelles. ISSN 0374-6429, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Wulff, J.L. (1996). Do the same sponge species live on both the Caribbean and eastern Pacific sides of the Isthmus of Panama? Med. K. Belg. Inst. Nat. Wet. 66(Suppl.): 165-173, more

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Document type: Conference paper

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  • Wulff, J.L.

Abstract
    Some species of shallow water sponges appear to occur on both the Caribbean and eastern Pacific sides of the Isthmus of Panama. Analysis of four of these species by traditional taxonomic techniques, including measurement of spicules and examination of skeletal construction, combined with ecological information, such as habitat distribution and palatability to fish predators, fails to distinguish between sponges living in one ocean from those living in the other.

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