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Mass, volume, and length relationships in plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) juveniles
Power, J.H.; Burger, M.J.; Stokes, A.M. (2007). Mass, volume, and length relationships in plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) juveniles. J. Sea Res. 57(Spec. Issue 2-3): 230-235
In: Journal of Sea Research. Elsevier/Netherlands Institute for Sea Research: Amsterdam; Den Burg. ISSN 1385-1101, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Power, J.H.; Burger, M.J.; Stokes, A.M. (2007). Mass, volume, and length relationships in plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) juveniles, in: Yamashita, Y. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Flatfish Ecology, Part 1, held at Maizuru, Kyoto, Japan from 20-25 October 2005. Journal of Sea Research, 57(Spec. Issue 2-3): pp. 230-235. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seares.2006.09.001, more

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Keywords
    Body size; Body weight; Growth; Juveniles; Length-weight relationships; Morphometry; Pleuronectes platessa Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]; ANE, Wadden Sea [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Power, J.H.
  • Burger, M.J.
  • Stokes, A.M.

Abstract
    The live body mass, body volume, and length were determined for four groups of juvenile plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.): (1) plaice immigrating into the Wadden Sea, (2) fish that had settled in the Wadden Sea, (3) settled fish that had been starved, and (4) laboratory-reared fish. Mass and volume values were obtained by applying Archimedes' principle to weights of fish obtained while they were immersed in waters of different densities. The allometric relationship of mass, volume, and length was determined for each group using principal component analysis. Fish in each treatment group had different mass-volume-length trajectories. Immigrating fish had the least mass and volume at fixed length, followed by settled fish, and laboratory-reared fish had the greatest mass at fixed length. Mass and volume differences between freshly captured settled fish and starved fish were slight. All treatments showed great variability in body mass and volume at fixed length, and the use of fish length alone as an index of fish size is problematic. It is suggested that centroid size is a better measurement of fish size when size is an important variate in a study.

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