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The Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS): the future of hyperspectral satellite sensors. Imagery of Oostende coastal and inland waters
Van Mol, B.; Ruddick, K. (2004). The Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS): the future of hyperspectral satellite sensors. Imagery of Oostende coastal and inland waters, in: (2004). Proceedings of the Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy workshop 8 October 2004 - Bruges, Belgium. pp. 1-10
In: (2004). Proceedings of the Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy workshop 8 October 2004 - Bruges, Belgium[s.n.]: Belgium, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 119279 [ OMA ]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Remote sensing; Satellite sensing; Spectral analysis; ANE, Belgium, Oostende [Marine Regions]; ANE, Belgium, Oostende Harbour, Sluice Dock [Marine Regions]; Marine

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  • BELCOLOUR - Optical remote sensing of coastal waters, more

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Abstract
    The gap between airborne imaging spectroscopy and traditional multi spectral satellite sensors is decreasing thanks to a new generation of satellite sensors of which CHRIS mounted on the small and low-cost PROBA satellite is the prototype. Although image acquisition and analysis are still in a test phase, the high spatial and spectral resolution and pointability have proved their potential. Because of the high resolution small features, which were before only visible on airborne images, become detectable. In particular coastal waters very close to the shore and inland waters become visible, opening up potential new application areas. This article gives a description of the CHRIS/PROBA system and compares it with a ocean color satellite sensors and airborne imaging spectrometers. A CHRIS image of the coastal waters of Oostende is used here to map suspended particulate matter. Analysis of imagery for an inland water body suggests that the near infrared (NIR) wavelengths are strongly affected by adjacency effects (environmental straylight).

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