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Settlement and early survival of red coral on artificial substrates in different geographic areas: Some clues for demography and restoration
Bramanti, L.; Rossi, S.; Tsounis, G.; Gili, J.M.; Santangelo, G. (2007). Settlement and early survival of red coral on artificial substrates in different geographic areas: Some clues for demography and restoration. Hydrobiologia 580(1): 219-224. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10750-006-0452-1
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: The Hague. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Bramanti, L.; Rossi, S.; Tsounis, G.; Gili, J.M.; Santangelo, G. (2007). Settlement and early survival of red coral on artificial substrates in different geographic areas: Some clues for demography and restoration, in: Relini, G. et al. (Ed.) Biodiversity in Enclosed Seas and Artificial Marine Habitats: Proceedings of the 39th European Marine Biology Symposium, held in Genoa, Italy, 21-24 July 2004. Developments in Hydrobiology, 193: pp. 219-224, more

Available in Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Artificial substrata; Larval settlement; Recruitment; Corallium rubrum (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Octocorallia [WoRMS]; MED, Western Mediterranean [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bramanti, L.
  • Rossi, S.
  • Tsounis, G.
  • Gili, J.M.
  • Santangelo, G.

Abstract
    The red coral Corallium rubrum (L 1758) is a long-lived, slow-growing gorgonian, endemic to Mediterranean rocky bottoms. Because of its high economic value, red coral has long been harvested, and most populations have been depleted. In the present study, 54 marble tiles were placed in June 2003 within red coral populations over 3 different geographic areas (Calafuria-Livorno and Elba MPA in Italy and Medes Islets MPA, in Spain), on vertical cliffs between 25 and 35 m. In each area 2 different sites were randomly selected. Tiles were subsequently sampled photographically. Between July and August 2003 red coral recruits settled on tiles in all the geographic areas and sites, exhibiting wide variability in their density. On the basis of a 2-factors nested ANOVA a significant variability between different sites at a few hundred metres distance occurred, indicating high variations in the recruitment process within the same red coral population. Mortality, measured in June 2004, widely varied between different geographic areas.

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