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The Eastern Pacific Parasmittina trispinosa complex (Bryozoa, Cheilostomatida): new and previously described species
Soule, D.F.; Soule, J.D. (2002). The Eastern Pacific Parasmittina trispinosa complex (Bryozoa, Cheilostomatida): new and previously described species. Irene McCulloch Foundation Monograph Series, 5. University of Southern California. Hancock Institute for Marine Studies: Los Angeles. 40 pp.
Part of: Irene McCulloch Foundation Monograph Series. University of Southern California. Hancock Institute for Marine Studies: Los Angeles, Calif.. ISSN 1067-8174, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Lower Invertebrates LOW.116 [122711]

Keywords
    Cosmopolite species; Marine invertebrates; New species; Synopsis; Taxonomy; Cheilostomatida [WoRMS]; Lyrula; Parasmittina trispinosa (Johnston, 1838) [WoRMS]; ISE, Ecuador, Galapagos Is. [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Soule, D.F.
  • Soule, J.D.

Abstract
    Parasmittina trispinosa having a wide range of variation have been reported in the past by many authors, making it supposedly cosmopolitan or nearly so, but P. trispinosa, sensu stricto, apparently does not occur in the cool or warm temperate northeastern or tropical eastern Pacific. The true species is probably restricted to Atlantic-boreal and perhaps Arctic distribution. A complex of unidentified and previously described species with large acute frontal avicularia occurs in the eastern Pacific from Puget Sound to the Galapagos Islands. All specimens examined have medium to large burred condyles, a medium to wide lyrula (median denticle) and numerous ovicell pores whereas P. trispinosa, sensu stricto, has small smooth condyles, a narrow to medium lyrula and few ovicell pores. Six new species from the northeastern Pacific complex and one new species from the western Caribbean are described. Nine previously described species, reported from Alaska to the Galapagos Islands, are re-examined.

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