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Maternal effects and larval survival of marbled sole Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae
Higashitani, T.; Takatsu, T.; Nakaya, M.; Joh, M.; Takahashi, T. (2007). Maternal effects and larval survival of marbled sole Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae. J. Sea Res. 58(1): 78-89. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seares.2007.01.005
In: Journal of Sea Research. Elsevier/Netherlands Institute for Sea Research: Amsterdam; Den Burg. ISSN 1385-1101, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Higashitani, T.; Takatsu, T.; Nakaya, M.; Joh, M.; Takahashi, T. (2007). Maternal effects and larval survival of marbled sole Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae, in: Yamashita, Y. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Flatfish Ecology, Part II, held at Maizuru, Kyoto, Japan from 20-25 October 2005. Journal of Sea Research, 58(1): pp. 78-89, more

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Keywords
    Fish larvae; Parental behaviour; Survival; Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae (Günther, 1877) [WoRMS]; INW, Japan, Hokkaido [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Higashitani, T.
  • Takatsu, T.
  • Nakaya, M.
  • Joh, M.
  • Takahashi, T.

Abstract
    Maternal effects of animals are the phenotypic influences of age, size, and condition of spawners on the survival and phenotypic traits of offspring. To clarify the maternal effects for marbled sole Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae, we investigated the effects of body size, nutrient condition, and growth history of adult females on egg size, larval size, and starvation tolerance, growth, and feeding ability of offspring. The fecundity of adult females was strongly dependent on body size. Path analysis revealed that the mother's total length positively affected mean egg diameter, meaning that large females spawned large eggs. In contrast, the relative growth rate of adult females negatively affected egg diameter. Egg diameters positively affected both notochord length and yolk sac volume of the larvae at hatching. Under starvation conditions, notochord length at hatching strongly and positively affected days of survival at 14 °C but not at 9 °C. Under adequate food conditions (1000 rotifers L-1), the notochord length of larvae 5 days after hatching positively affected feeding rate, implying that large larvae have high feeding ability. In addition, the mean growth rate of larvae between 0 and 15 days increased with increasing egg diameter under homogenous food conditions, suggesting that larvae hatched from large eggs might have a growth advantage for at least to 15 days after hatching. In marbled sole, these relationships (i.e., mother's body size-egg size-larval size-larval resistance to starvation-larval feeding ability) may help explain recruitment variability.

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