IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Diet and weaning age affect the growth and condition of Dover sole (Solea solea L.)
Rueda-Jasso, R.; Conceição, L.E.C.; De Coen, W.M.; Rees, J.F.; Sorgeloos, P. (2007). Diet and weaning age affect the growth and condition of Dover sole (Solea solea L.), in: VLIZ Coll. Rep. 35-36(2005-2006). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 35-36: pp. Chapter 28
In: (2007). VLIZ Coll. Rep. 35-36(2005-2006). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 35-36. Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ): Oostende, more
In: VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee: Oostende. ISSN 1376-3822, more

Also published as
  • Rueda-Jasso, R.; Conceição, L.E.C.; De Coen, W.M.; Rees, J.F.; Sorgeloos, P. (2005). Diet and weaning age affect the growth and condition of Dover sole (Solea solea L.). Cienc. Mar. 31(3): 477-489, more

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Diets; Larvae; Artemia Leach, 1819 [WoRMS]; Solea solea (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Solea solea (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Dover sole; larvae; weaning; inert diets; Artemia

Authors  Top 
  • Rueda-Jasso, R.
  • Conceição, L.E.C.
  • De Coen, W.M., more

Abstract
    The effect of diet type (frozen Artemia biomass and two inert diets: micro-bound [MB] and micro-extruded [ME]) and two weaning ages (early weaning and late weaning, 50 and 64 days after hatching, respectively) were studied iSolea solea larvae. The experiment lasted 56 and 42 days for early and late weaning, respectively. The mortality results showed the highest values for late weaning (39%) in theArtemia treatment. No significant differences in mortality were observed between the inert diets.The final dry weight values were higher for late weaning than for early weaning. At both weaning ages, fish receiving the same treatments had similar tendencies for dry weight and standard length. Fish fed with MB presented significantly higher dry weight and standard length, followed by ME, while the lowest values at both weaning ages were recorded for the Artemia treatment. Similar amounts of highly unsaturated fatty acid fractions among the inert diets were reflected by the absence of significant differences in the susceptibility to oxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances testing); however, significant differences were found in carbohydrate, protein and lipid contents of whole-body homogenates for both early and late weaning. At the end of the experiment no significant differences in biochemical contents were observed between the two inert diets. The results of this study suggest that weaning starting on day 50 (early weaning), using a good quality inert diet, leads to higher survival, growth and fish condition.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors