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Strategies for successful marine conservation: Integrating socioeconomic, political, and scientific factors
Lundquist, C.J.; Granek, E.F. (2005). Strategies for successful marine conservation: Integrating socioeconomic, political, and scientific factors. Conserv. Biol. 19(6): 1771-1778. dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2005.00279.x
In: Conservation Biology. Wiley: Cambridge. ISSN 0888-8892, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Marine reserves; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Lundquist, C.J.
  • Granek, E.F.

Abstract
    As the process of marine-protected-area design and implementation evolves, the incorporation of new tools will advance our ability to create and maintain effective protected areas. We reviewed characteristics and approaches that contribute to successful global marine conservation efforts. One successful characteristic emphasized in most case studies is the importance of incorporating stakeholders at all phases of the process. Clearly defined goals and objectives at all stages of the design process are important for improved communication and standardized expectations of stakeholder groups. The inclusion of available science to guide the size and design of marine protected areas and to guide clear monitoring strategies that assess success at scientific, social, and economic levels is also an important tool in the process. Common shortcomings in marine conservation planning strategies include government instability and resultant limitations to monitoring and enforcement, particularly in developing nations. Transferring knowledge to local community members has also presented challenges in areas where in situ training, local capacity, and existing infrastructure are sparse. Inaccessible, unavailable, or outdated science is often a limitation to conservation projects in developed and developing nations. To develop and maintain successful marine protected areas, it is necessary to acknowledge that each case is unique, to apply tools and lessons learned from other marine protected areas, and to maintain flexibility to adjust to the individual circumstances of the case at hand.

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