IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Emerging technologies in biological sampling,. A report of SCOR working group 90
Herman, A.W. (1993). Emerging technologies in biological sampling,. A report of SCOR working group 90. UNESCO Technical Papers in Marine Science = Documents techniques de l'Unesco sur les sciences de la mer, 66. UNESCO: Paris. vi, 48 pp.
Part of: UNESCO Technical Papers in Marine Science = Documents techniques de l'Unesco sur les sciences de la mer. UNESCO: Paris. ISSN 0503-4299, more

Available in Author 

Keywords
    Marine technology; Zooplankton; Marine

Author  Top 
  • Herman, A.W.

Abstract
    Technology development as we know it today is and should be driven by the science in which it is applied. Initial science objectives of large scale international programs, such as JGOFS and GLOBEC, outline sampling technology needs at their outset and iitiate specific technological development. Described here are a variety of technologies-recent and not-sorecent- which are emerging in the 90's and will provide biological oceanography with newer and more powerful tools and greater insights with a wider scope of measurements. There are three areas of focus: 1) Platforms, 2) Fluorescence and 3) Particles. Under 'Platforms', vehicles and methods of sampling are described loading the way into a discussionn of the sensors used in the measurement of various biological parameters. In this recent scientific age of climatic influence of ocean ecology, long-term monitoring has been identified as a need which is presently encouraging new developments in mooring technology. In some cases specific measurement technologies which have been only recently developed, e.g. 'pump and probe fluorescence' or the 'SeaWiFS', are emerging technologies which are destined for broader and more intensive applications. Many technologies are potentially overlapping in application. For example, the historical technology of light attenuance has been recently intergrated with the emerging technology of flow cytometry yielding new insights in patterns of primary production. The coalition of three technologies, that is, acoustics and the emerging technologies of video and optical plankton counting are also described indicating their future potential for the counting and identification of zooplankton.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author