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Kingiella chilenica (Bivalvia: Cyamiidae); population dynamics, rates of survival, embryo production and annual recruitment of a semelparous brooding clam
Gallardo, C.S.; Filún, M.; Manque, C. (2006). Kingiella chilenica (Bivalvia: Cyamiidae); population dynamics, rates of survival, embryo production and annual recruitment of a semelparous brooding clam. J. Mar. Biol. Ass. U.K. 86(4): 757-766. hdl.handle.net/10.1017/S0025315406013671
In: Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Cambridge University Press/Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom: Cambridge. ISSN 0025-3154, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Fecundity; Population dynamics; Recruitment; Survival; Reloncavia chilenica (Soot-Ryen, 1957) [WoRMS]; PSW, Chile, Araucania, Queule Estuary [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Gallardo, C.S.
  • Filún, M.
  • Manque, C.

Abstract
    Kingiella chilenica, a brooder mollusc, inhabiting soft bottoms of estuarine tidal flats of southern Chile, is well suited to study larval recruitment. It is a tiny semelparous clam with an annual cycle, and whose recruits must survive an inhospitable winter season prior to growing and reaching reproductive maturity in the following summer season. The population dynamics of this clam was studied through periodic sampling over two successive years to follow fluctuations in its' abundance. Obtained data on embryo production and recruit survival over both periods shows that population abundance varied widely between the two years of study. A high level on recruit survival through the winter of the first year resulted in high numbers of adults in the corresponding summer reproductive season. An inverse situation occurred in the second year, with lower recuit survival and, consequently, fewer reproducing adults. However, the lower abundance of adults in the second year was compensated by their having a higher survival rate over the reproductive season as compared with adults of the previous year. Independently of the abundance of the adults, the number of embryos incubated per female was very similar between both periods. Consequently, the authors suggest that the net contribution of juveniles produced by females per unit substrate was similar between the annual cycles studied.

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