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Pressure coring, logging and subsampling with the HYACINTH system
Schultheiss, P.J.; Francis, T.J.G.; Holland, M.; Roberts, J.A.; Amann, H.; Thjunjoto; Parkes, R.J.; Martin, D.; Rothfuss, M.; Tyunder, F.; Jackson, P.D. (2006). Pressure coring, logging and subsampling with the HYACINTH system, in: Rothwell, R.G. (Ed.) New techniques in sediment core analysis. Geological Society Special Publication, 267: pp. 151-163
In: Rothwell, R.G. (Ed.) (2006). New techniques in sediment core analysis. Geological Society Special Publication, 267. Geological Society: London, UK. ISBN 1-86239-210-2. 266 pp., more
In: Hartley, A.J. et al. (Ed.) Geological Society Special Publication. Geological Society of London: Oxford; London; Edinburgh; Boston, Mass.; Carlton, Vic.. ISSN 0305-8719, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Schultheiss, P.J.
  • Francis, T.J.G.
  • Holland, M.
  • Roberts, J.A.
  • Amann, H.
  • Thjunjoto
  • Parkes, R.J.
  • Martin, D.
  • Rothfuss, M.
  • Tyunder, F.
  • Jackson, P.D.

Abstract
    The HYACINTH suite of equipment has been developed to investigate the pressure sensitive behaviour of sedimentary formations up to 250 bar (25 MPa). It does this by collecting pressure-preserved samples from boreholes that can be retrieved, sub-sampled and analysed in controlled conditions in the laboratory. This paper reviews the development of the system, how it originated from the need to better understand the nature and distribution of gas hydrates beneath the sea bed, and its achievements to date. While gas hydrates continue to be the major scientific and commercial impetus for using, and further developing, this pressure-sampling technology, other important scientific driving forces, including the growing interest in the deep biosphere beneath the sea floor, are playing an important role. We review the downhole tools, the transfer system and the suite of different pressure chambers that are required to make a complete working system. Non-destructive logging of cores contained in pressure chambers, using existing gamma- and X-ray techniques, is discussed, as are future logging techniques that will have sensors embedded within the pressure chambers. Subsamples can now be taken at full pressure and transferred into specialized chambers where intrusive measurements and experiments can be performed (e.g. inoculation chambers for microbiology). The versatile philosophy behind the integrated systems will enable future developments to be made by third parties who want to obtain subsamples at in situ pressure from the HYACINTH system. We conclude by reviewing some of the highlights of the HYACINTH operations on ODP Leg 204 where the downhole tools retrieved cores containing gas hydrates (up to 40% by volume) that were subsequently logged on board in the laboratory. These data have already contributed to the scientific understanding of the nature and distribution of gas hydrates beneath the seabed in one area on the Oregon Margin off the USA.

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