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Growth and food conversion in juvenile southern sea bass, Centropristis melana (Ginsburg), fed commercial and seminatural diets
Harpster, B.V.; Roberts, D.E.; Bruger, G.E. (1977). Growth and food conversion in juvenile southern sea bass, Centropristis melana (Ginsburg), fed commercial and seminatural diets, in: Wolfe, D.A. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the World Mariculture Society held at San Jose, Costa Rica, January 9-13, 1977. pp. 795-809
In: Wolfe, D.A. (Ed.) (1977). Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the World Mariculture Society held at San Jose, Costa Rica, January 9-13, 1977. Second edition. Louisiana State University. Division of Continuing Education: Charleston, SC (USA). 984; 52 pp., more

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Keywords
    Fish culture; Food conversion; Growth; Marine aquaculture; Centropristis melana Ginsburg, 1952 [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Harpster, B.V.
  • Roberts, D.E.
  • Bruger, G.E.

Abstract
    Laboratory-reared juvenile southern sea bass, Centropristis melana (Ginsberg), were studied to evaluate effects of five diets on growth and food conversion. Diets studied were Marine Ration 20, squid, Marine Ration 30, Catfish Cage Chow, and Trout Chow; each diet had a different total protein content. Diet treatments were conducted using a completely random design in 2 . 36 x 0 . 97 x 0 . 50 m tanks with biological filtration. Fish were fed twice daily at 3% body weight day-1 and reduced to 2% body weight at the first signs of wastage. Body weights and total lengths were recorded every two weeks. The Marine Ration 20 diet was terminated at sampling period I due to diet rejection and high mortalities. Significant differences ( alpha = 0 . 05) in mean body weights among remaining diets occurred by the eighth week, as demonstrated by Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. The experiment was terminated after ten weeks. Of all diet treatments taken to termination, juveniles fed squid suffered the highest number of mortalities. Food conversion (g feed g-1 gain) and mean percent body weight increase for Trout Chow, squid, Catfish Cage Chow, and Marine Ration 30 were 1 . 30 and 172 . 90%, 1 . 55 and 180 . 57%, 2 . 48 and 63 . 10%, and 3 . 55 and 56 . 00%, respectively. Results of all measured parameters show that Trout Chow was superior in rearing juvenile southern sea bass.

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