IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Trends and timescales in soil development on coastal dunes in the north of Ireland
Wilson, P. (1992). Trends and timescales in soil development on coastal dunes in the north of Ireland, in: Carter, R.W.G. et al. (Ed.) Coastal dunes: geomorphology, ecology and management for conservation: Proceedings of the 3rd European Dune Congress Galway, Ireland, 17-21 June 1992. pp. 153-162
In: Carter, R.W.G. et al. (Ed.) (1992). Coastal dunes: geomorphology, ecology and management for conservation: Proceedings of the 3rd European Dune Congress Galway, Ireland, 17-21 June 1992. A.A. Balkema [etc.]: Rotterdam. ISBN 90-5410-058-3. 533 pp., more

Available in Author 

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • Wilson, P.

Abstract
    Field descriptions and laboratory analyses of ground soils and buried soils in freely-drained sites on coastal dunes in the north of Ireland have been used to establish trends (development stages) in soil formation. Timescales for the development stages have been based on documentary evidence and radiocarbon dating. Recently deposited or disturbed dune sand, lacking pedological horizonation, is termed raw sand (stage I). These materials may progress to sand-pararendzinas (stage II) within 16 years following vegetation colonisation and surface stabilisation. With continuing pedogenesis, sand-pararendzinas are transformed to brown calcareous sands (stage III). In low carbonate dunes, this has occurred within 75 years. This type of soil may persist and thicken to more than 2m or may progress to a podzolic soil (stage IV). A podzolic soil has formed within the last 600 years in one dune system. The variety of podzolic soils recorded suggests a development sequence within this major group, but more information is required before this can be outlined. Where dunes have been afforested with conifers within the last 40 years, no evidence has been found for the development of micropodzols.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author