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The ecology of vegetation of the Asperillo dune system, southwest Spain
Diaz Barradas, M.C.; Muñoz Reinoso, J.C. (1992). The ecology of vegetation of the Asperillo dune system, southwest Spain, in: Carter, R.W.G. et al. (Ed.) Coastal dunes: geomorphology, ecology and management for conservation: Proceedings of the 3rd European Dune Congress Galway, Ireland, 17-21 June 1992. pp. 211-218
In: Carter, R.W.G. et al. (Ed.) (1992). Coastal dunes: geomorphology, ecology and management for conservation: Proceedings of the 3rd European Dune Congress Galway, Ireland, 17-21 June 1992. A.A. Balkema [etc.]: Rotterdam. ISBN 90-5410-058-3. 533 pp., more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Diaz Barradas, M.C.
  • Muñoz Reinoso, J.C.

Abstract
    The Asperillo dune system is one of the most interesting and large coastal ecosystems of the southwest Spain, extending over 30 km from Mazagón to Torre la Higuera (Matalascañas). The area was studied by airphoto interpretation and field sampling (a transect was taken inland from the edge of the cliff ending close to the eolian sand sheets). With the help of these techniques different geomorphological and ecological units were distinguished. On the beach, the typical species are Cakile maritim and Elymusfarctus. The 60 m high cliff, with a maximum 60 degree slope, is an area of intense morphological change with strong winds, landslides, mass wasting and surface washing. The cliff vegetation includes representative species such as Ammophila arenaria and Malcolmia littorea. Beyond the cliff there is a plateau with stabilized dunes, covered with plantations of umbrella pine (Pinus pinea). The plateau ends in a steep slope, abutting an older system of stabilized dunes, populated by an original forest of Juniperus phoenicea. Further inland extends a large system of degraded eolian sand sheets, covered with plantations of Pinus pinea.

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