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Management and conservation of sand dunes in Denmark
Feilberg, A.; Jensen, F. (1992). Management and conservation of sand dunes in Denmark, in: Carter, R.W.G. et al. (Ed.) Coastal dunes: geomorphology, ecology and management for conservation: Proceedings of the 3rd European Dune Congress Galway, Ireland, 17-21 June 1992. pp. 429-437
In: Carter, R.W.G. et al. (Ed.) (1992). Coastal dunes: geomorphology, ecology and management for conservation: Proceedings of the 3rd European Dune Congress Galway, Ireland, 17-21 June 1992. A.A. Balkema [etc.]: Rotterdam. ISBN 90-5410-058-3. 533 pp., more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Feilberg, A.
  • Jensen, F.

Abstract
    The National Forest and Nature Agency under the Ministry of Environment issues a manual about conservation of nature areas and cultural landscapes. The manual is being rewritten in 1991 and the chapter about dunes will be discussed here. After a short introduction dealing with the formation of the Danish dunes and their location, the various ecological systems and their dynamics are described. The chapter in the manual deals with the white (or the active) dune, the green (or the greensward) dune, the brown dune, the grey dune, stone plains, shallow dune lakes, dune moors, Hippophaë and Quercus shrubs and internal dunes. Each ecological system is briefly described and the dominant plant species are listed. The need for conservation of the dune areas depends on the imminent threats. In places, the dune system is a vital part of the coastal defence and here the maintainence of an even and stable dune has first priority. Sand drift is still a problem which has to be dealt with when the drifting sand engulfs urban areas, summer houses etc. Intensive human activity (tourism) may be too much for some dune areas and may call for counter-measures. Industrial plants, houses etc. are not consistent with a natural dune but Danish legislation is restrictive so it is extremely difficult to locate new buildings in such areas. Overgrowth by self propagating mountain pine and other tree species occurs in places. Both threats and means to resist such threats are described. Supervising the state of the dunes is mentioned. In some areas lichens are monitored in order to check air pollution. Existing legislation is described as the Danish parliament is currently discussing a new nature protection Bill. Finally, the most vulnerable ecological systems and species are mentioned.

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