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Marine chemical ecology: chemical signals and cues structure marine populations, communities, and ecosystems
Hay, M.E. (2009). Marine chemical ecology: chemical signals and cues structure marine populations, communities, and ecosystems, in: Carlson, C.A. et al. (Ed.) Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. 1. Annual Review of Marine Science, 1: pp. 193-212. https://hdl.handle.net/10.1146/annurev.marine.010908.163708
In: Carlson, C.A.; Giovannoni, S.J. (Ed.) (2009). Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. 1. Annual Review of Marine Science, 1. Annual Reviews: Palo Alto. ISBN 978-0-8243-4501-3. 466 pp., more
In: Annual Review of Marine Science. Annual Reviews: Palo Alto, Calif. ISSN 1941-1405, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine
Author keywords
    chemical communication; competition; consumer-prey interactions;reproduction; smell of death; tritrophic interactions

Author  Top 
  • Hay, M.E.

Abstract
    Chemical cues constitute much of the language of life in the sea. Our understanding of biotic interactions and their effects on marine ecosystems will advance more rapidly if this language is studied and understood. Here, I review how chemical cues regulate critical aspects of the behavior of marine organisms from bacteria to phytoplankton to benthic invertebrates and water column fishes. These chemically mediated interactions strongly affect population structure, community organization, and ecosystem function. Chemical cues determine foraging strategies, feeding choices, commensal associations, selection of mates and habitats, competitive interactions, and transfer of energy and nutrients within and among ecosystems. In numerous cases, the indirect effects of chemical signals on behavior have as much or more effect on community Structure and function as the direct effects of consumers and pathogens. Chemical cues are critical for understanding marine systems, but their omnipresence and impact are inadequately recognized.

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