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Bio-physical oceanographic interactions at the edge of the Arctic ice pack
Niebauer, H.J. (1991). Bio-physical oceanographic interactions at the edge of the Arctic ice pack, in: Nihoul, J.C.J. et al. Ice covered seas and ice edges. Physical, chemical and biological processes and interactions: proceedings of the 22th International Liège Colloquium on Ocean Hydrodynamics. Journal of Marine Systems, 2: pp. 209-232
In: Nihoul, J.C.J.; Djenidi, S. (1991). Ice covered seas and ice edges. Physical, chemical and biological processes and interactions: proceedings of the 22th International Liège Colloquium on Ocean Hydrodynamics. Journal of Marine Systems, 2. Elsevier Science Publishers: Amsterdam. 520 pp., more
In: Journal of Marine Systems. Elsevier: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; Amsterdam. ISSN 0924-7963, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

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  • Niebauer, H.J.

Abstract
    About 7% of the world ocean is subject to the seasonal advance and retreat of sea ice. Physical processes at ice edges, interacting with biological phenomena, have been observed to promote phytoplankton blooms in both the Arctic (e.g., Bering and Greenland Seas) and the Antarctic. This interaction occurs primarily in spring with the retreating and melting sea ice laying down low-salinity derived stratification that reduces mixing in the photic zone which encourages a phytoplankton bloom. However other physical processes, such as oceanic eddys and fronts also play a role in enhancing primary productivity at the ice edge. This paper reviews biophysical oceanographic and meteorological interactions observed in both the eastern (Greenland Sea) and western (Bering Sea) Arctic. Comparisons of the physical and biological characteristics for these areas, as well as additional comparisons with the Barents Sea and Antarctic waters and other regions of the world ocean are presented. An estimate of some outstanding marginal ice edge research problems is also included.

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