IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Crystallographic structure of sea ice along a salinity gradient and environmental control of microalgae in the brine cells
Legendre, L.; Aota, M.; Shirasawa, K.; Martineau, M.-J.; Ishikawa, M. (1991). Crystallographic structure of sea ice along a salinity gradient and environmental control of microalgae in the brine cells, in: Nihoul, J.C.J. et al. Ice covered seas and ice edges. Physical, chemical and biological processes and interactions: proceedings of the 22th International Liège Colloquium on Ocean Hydrodynamics. Journal of Marine Systems, 2: pp. 347-357
In: Nihoul, J.C.J.; Djenidi, S. (1991). Ice covered seas and ice edges. Physical, chemical and biological processes and interactions: proceedings of the 22th International Liège Colloquium on Ocean Hydrodynamics. Journal of Marine Systems, 2. Elsevier Science Publishers: Amsterdam. 520 pp., more
In: Journal of Marine Systems. Elsevier: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; Amsterdam. ISSN 0924-7963, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Legendre, L.
  • Aota, M.
  • Shirasawa, K.
  • Martineau, M.-J.
  • Ishikawa, M.

Abstract
    Duplicate ice cores were taken in southeastern Hudson Bay (Canadian Arctic), at 8 stations along a transect, from the mouth of the Great Whale River to saline waters 25 km offshore. One core from each station was cut into 10-cm sections, which were melted at room temperature for determinations of salinity, nutrients, algal pigments and taxonomic composition of the microalgal assemblages. On the second core, thin sections were cut every 2 cm to optically determine the ratio of brine/gas pockets to the total sections. Relative volumes of brine in melted samples were computed from the observed ratios and calculated values, and used to convert per unit brine volume the concentrations of pigments, nutrients and algal cells, initially measured per unit volume of melted sample.Salinity of the melted samples indicate the presence of freshwater beneath the sea ice close to shore throughout the growth season, and the vertical salinity profiles suggest intermittent intrusions of freshwater. Nutrient concentrations in the brine were high, suggesting that microalgae in the brine cells were generally not nutrient limited. Concentrations of ice algae in the brine cells reached relatively high values, that are often of the same order as those reported for eutrophic marine waters. Statistical analyses identified the rate of ice growth as the most important factor controlling the vertical and horizontal distributions of algal biomass and taxonomic composition in the sea ice, along the salinity gradient. Higher biomasses were generally associated with slower ice growth and also possibly lower grazing activity. In addition, the rate of ice growth influenced the distribution of microalgal assemblages, with nitrogen limitation potentially playing a secondary role in some instances.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors