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Effects of water temperature on year-class strengths and growth patterns of pikeperch (Sander lucioperca (L.)) in the brackish Baltic Sea
Lappalainen, J.; Milardi, M.; Nyberg, K.; Venäläinen, A. (2009). Effects of water temperature on year-class strengths and growth patterns of pikeperch (Sander lucioperca (L.)) in the brackish Baltic Sea. Aquat. Ecol. 43(1): 181-191. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10452-007-9150-y
In: Aquatic Ecology. Springer: Berlin. ISSN 1386-2588, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Climate change; Growth; Modelling; Water temperature; ANE, Baltic [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Lappalainen, J.
  • Milardi, M.
  • Nyberg, K.
  • Venäläinen, A.

Abstract
    Pikeperch (Sander lucioperca), the studied species, is the most important amongst freshwater fish species, commercially, in the brackish Baltic Sea. We studied the effects of water temperature on three aspects of pikeperch growth in Haminanlahti Bay, Finland. First, annual length increments were related to age and temperature using a non-linear growth model. Since length increments were based on back-calculated lengths, i.e. repeated measurements, the first order autoregressive covariance structure was used. The model showed that when temperature increased annual length increments also increased, whereas increased age reduced annual length increments. In the modelling, the best fit was found with water degree-days over 10°C. Second, the onset of growth of pikeperch in spring had a positive relationship with water temperature and a negative one with the length of pikeperch. The latter finding suggests that smaller, non-mature pikeperch starts to grow earlier than larger, mature pikeperch. Third, the year-class strength was positively correlated with water degree-days, and the year-class strength negatively affected annual length increments. This indicates that within a strong year-class subsequent growth is reduced more that within a weak year-class, suggesting density-dependent growth.

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