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Influence of temperature and food availability on the ecological energetics of the giant scallop Placopecten magellanicus. 3. Physiological ecology, the gametogenic cycle and scope for growth
MacDonald, B.A.; Thompson, R.J. (1986). Influence of temperature and food availability on the ecological energetics of the giant scallop Placopecten magellanicus. 3. Physiological ecology, the gametogenic cycle and scope for growth. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 93(1): 37-48
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Placopecten magellanicus (Gmelin, 1791) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • MacDonald, B.A.
  • Thompson, R.J.

Abstract
    Scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) were collected in 1981-1983 from two water depths at a location in Newfoundland, Canada, where temperature and food conditions associated with shallower water have been shown to be more favourable for somatic growth and gamete production. To gain insight into the seasonal energy balance for this species, metabolic and clearance rates were measured monthly under ambient temperature conditions and natural seston levels. Stereological techniques were used to determine the gamete volume fraction in the gonad in order to establish the annual reporductive cycle. The less favourable conditions associated with deeper water were relfected in reduced rates of gamete development, but the diameter of spawned eggs and the timing of spawning appeared unaffected by poorer conditions in the natural environment. Estimates of scope for growth were low or negative during the winter, but consistently high during the spring bloom, corresponding to a period of rapid gamete maturation. Somatic weight declined in both populations as gamete development proceeded but increased again during periods of low gametogenic activity, suggesting a close relationship between energy available for growth and the reproductive cycle. Oxygen uptake and clearance rate varied seasonally in relation to ambient temperature and food conditions, all of which appeared to be interrelated in a complex fashion with the energy demands of gametogenesis.

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