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Current status of world bivalve aquaculture and trade
Lovatelli, A.; Vannuccini, S.; McLeod, D. (2008). Current status of world bivalve aquaculture and trade, in: Lovatelli, A. et al. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12: pp. 46-59
In: Lovatelli, A.; Farías, A.; Uriarte, I. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12. FAO: Rome. ISBN 978-92-5-306115-0. 359 pp., more
In: FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura. FAO: Roma. ISSN 2071-1026, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Lovatelli, A.
  • Vannuccini, S.
  • McLeod, D.

Abstract
    In 2005, bivalves represented 10 percent in quantity and 7 percent in value of the total world fishery production. World bivalve production has increased substantially in the last fifty years, going from nearly one million tonnes in 1950 to about 13.6 million tonnes in 2005. China is by far the leading producer of bivalves followed by Japan, the United States of America, the Republic of Korea, Thailand, France, Spain, Italy and Chile. In the same year aquaculture production of bivalves in the Latin America and the Caribbean reached approximately 128 500 tonnes which represented 1.07 percent of the global total for aquaculture production and an estimated farm-gate value of USD 432 million. Chile has led the region in production followed by Brazil and Peru. The primary species produced are the Chilean mussel and the Peruvian calico scallop. In 2005, total exports of bivalves from Latin America and the Caribbean were 18 500 tonnes, worth USD 124 million. Scallops and pectens are by far the main bivalve species exported followed by clams.

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