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Estado actual de la acuicultura de moluscos bivalvos en Ecuador
Alvarez, R.; Cobo, L.; Sonnenholzner, S.; Stern, S. (2008). Estado actual de la acuicultura de moluscos bivalvos en Ecuador, in: Lovatelli, A. et al. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12: pp. 129-133
In: Lovatelli, A.; Farías, A.; Uriarte, I. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12. FAO: Rome. ISBN 978-92-5-306115-0. 359 pp., more
In: FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura. FAO: Roma. ISSN 2071-1026, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Alvarez, R.
  • Cobo, L.
  • Sonnenholzner, S.
  • Stern, S.

Abstract
    The culture of marine bivalves in Ecuador initiated in 1990 with the creation of the National Centre for Aquaculture and Marine Research (CENAIM). The first species to be cultured was the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas introduced from Chile. This species has been successfully introduced and currently exploited commercially on a small-scale. The native scallop mollusc, Argopecten ventricosus, is also cultured at CENAIM and to a certain extent has demonstrated some commercial value on local markets. Various methods are employed in the culture of molluscs: suspended longlines, pearl nets, trays, etc., placed in the sea or shrimp ponds that have suitable farming conditions. A number of other mollusc species have been added to the current research programme including Nodipecten subnodosus, a large pectinidae found in local coastal waters commonly known as the “mano de leon”. This species has significant commercial value, hence there is an interest in developing its culture technology. Recently, CENAIM successfully closed the life cycle of the mollusc belonging to the genus Spondylus (known as thorny or spiny oysters. There are several indigenous species found along Ecuador’s coast which are commercially important also from a socioeconomic and cultural points of view. The development of a thriving mollusc culture industry has yet to occur in Ecuador, however, recent technical developments, combined with a growing interest of the private sector in mollusc aquaculture, will hopefully see Ecuador following a similar path set by Chile and Peru.

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