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Estado actual y perspectivas de cultivo de moluscos bivalvos en Venezuela
Lodeiros Seijo, C.; Freites Valbuena, L. (2008). Estado actual y perspectivas de cultivo de moluscos bivalvos en Venezuela, in: Lovatelli, A. et al. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12: pp. 135-150
In: Lovatelli, A.; Farías, A.; Uriarte, I. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12. FAO: Rome. ISBN 978-92-5-306115-0. 359 pp., more
In: FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura. FAO: Roma. ISSN 2071-1026, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Lodeiros Seijo, C.
  • Freites Valbuena, L.

Abstract
    In Venezuela bivalve aquaculture has always been considered as an potential industryfor the mass production of marine products, particularly in the northeast regions. Only in the 1970s and 1980s a few companies began producing between 200- 300 tonnes of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae and Crassostrea virginica) and one species of mussel (Perna perna). Many other species have been identified as potential candidates for aquaculture. The green mussel, Perna viridis, and the pearl oysters Pteria colymbus and Pinctada imbricata (for human consumption and pearl production) show acceptable natural seed abundance, elevated growth and survival rates under culture conditions. The commercial hatchery production of Euvola ziczac and Nodipecten nodosus seed has been demonstrated along with their culture techniques. The farming of these two scallop species (as well as of Crassostrea rhizophorae) could also contribute to the maintenance of the native populations particularly, as most natural banks have been overexploited in the last decade. The significant increase in consumption of marine products in Venezuela and the availability of funds from the Venezuelan government for food production, particularly is support of aquaculture activities in coastal communities, indicates a positive scenario for the development of mollusc aquaculture in Venezuela.

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