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La patología en moluscos bivalvos: principales problemas y desafíos para la producción de bivalvos en América Latina
Cáceres-Martínez, J.; Vásquez-Yeomans, R. (2008). La patología en moluscos bivalvos: principales problemas y desafíos para la producción de bivalvos en América Latina, in: Lovatelli, A. et al. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12: pp. 327-337
In: Lovatelli, A.; Farías, A.; Uriarte, I. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12. FAO: Rome. ISBN 978-92-5-306115-0. 359 pp., more
In: FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura. FAO: Roma. ISSN 2071-1026, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Cáceres-Martínez, J.
  • Vásquez-Yeomans, R.

Abstract
    According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the contribution of aquaculture to the world food supply continues to grow. This growth is faster than any other growth achieved by other animal food industries. Amongst the groups of cultured species, bivalves contribute to almost 23 percent of the global production. In 2002, mollusc production reached 12 million tonnes and since then this figure has continued to increase. In Latin America, several valuable species of bivalve molluscs such as the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, and the blue mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, are cultured. Moreover, several native species such as the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, the pearl oyster, Pincatada mazatlanica, the north oyster, Argopecten purpuratus, and the chorito, Mytilus chilensis, are also cultured. Additionally, there are other native species with culture potential. Aquaculture diversification, increased food demand and economic globalization have amplified the risk for pathogens dispersion. Among these pathogens are: Perkinsus marinus, Perkinsus olseni, Haplosporidium nelsoni, Marteilia refringens, Bonamia exitiosa, Bonamia ostreae and Mikrocitos mackini, which have been widely studied in developed countries and enlisted by the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE). In Latin America, some of those pathogens have also been detected including P. marinus in C. virginica and P. olseni in Pitar rostrata, Bonamia sp. In Tiostrea chilensis and Ostrea puelchana. However, there is little information on their effect on production. In this scenario, it is necessary to trigger studies related to pathologies and health problems that affect bivalve molluscs in Latin America in order to establish sanitary maps and to develop management measures for control. This would be sustained by a Latin American network of laboratories for research and diagnostic.

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