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Feeding, particle selection and carbon absorption in Mytilus edulis in different mixtures of algae and resuspended bottom material
Kiorboe, T.; Møhlenberg, F.; Nøhr, O. (1980). Feeding, particle selection and carbon absorption in Mytilus edulis in different mixtures of algae and resuspended bottom material. Ophelia 19(2): 193-205
In: Ophelia: International Journal of Marine Biology. Ophelia Publications: Helsingør. ISSN 0078-5326, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Filter feeders; Food absorption; Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Kiorboe, T.
  • Møhlenberg, F.
  • Nøhr, O.

Abstract
    M. edulis were fed mixtures of algae (10,000 Phaeodactylum tricornutum cells/ml) and natural silt (0 to 55 mg/l), and the effects of silt concentration on filtration behaviour, food uptake and carbon budget were studied. Particle clearance average 66 ml/min at 3.5 mg silt/l, and decreased at higher and lower concentrations. Increasing amounts of material were retained by the gills with increasing silt concentration, but and increasing proportion of this was rejected as pseudofaeces. Dry matter ingestion increased with increasing concentraton of silt. The mussels were able to select between algae and silt particles by clearing the material rejected as pseudofaeces of about 2/3 of the algae. The carbon ingestion rate increased considerably at a low concentration of silt compared to a suspension of pure algae, and decreased at higher concentrations. Carbon absorption efficiencies were high (between 59 and 65%) up to a silt concentration of 25 mg/l, and decreased slightly at higher concentrations. The amount of carbon absorbed consequently increased by the addition of silt. It is concluded that Mytilus is well adapted to silt concentrations up to 55 mg/l. The potential food diluting effect of silt in suspension is effectively counteracted, especially by particle selection and increased ingestion, and Mytilus even benefits from concentrations up to 25 mg/l.

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