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The meiobenthos of five mangrove vegetation types in Gazi Bay, Kenya
Vanhove, S.; Vincx, M.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Gijselinck, W.; Schram, D. (1992). The meiobenthos of five mangrove vegetation types in Gazi Bay, Kenya. Hydrobiologia 247: 99-108
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: Berlin. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article

Also published as
  • Vanhove, S.; Vincx, M.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Gijselinck, W.; Schram, D. (1992). The meiobenthos of five mangrove vegetation types in Gazi Bay, Kenya, in: Jaccarini, V. et al. (Ed.) (1992). The Ecology of Mangrove and Related Ecosystems: Proceedings of the International Symposium held at Mombasa, Kenya, 24-30 September 1990. Developments in Hydrobiology, 80: pp. 99-108, more
  • Vanhove, S.; Vincx, M.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Gijselinck, W.; Schram, D. (1992). The meiobenthos of five mangrove vegetation types in Gazi Bay, Kenya, in: (1992). IZWO Coll. Rep. 22(1992). IZWO Collected Reprints, 22: pp. chapter 41 [Subsequent publication], more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Interstitial environment; Mangrove swamps; Meiobenthos; Population density; Sediments; Vertical distribution; Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh. [WoRMS]; Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Lamk. [WoRMS]; Ceriops tagal (Perr.) C.B. Robinson [WoRMS]; Nematoda [WoRMS]; Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. [WoRMS]; Sonneratia alba J. Smith [WoRMS]; ISW, Kenya, Gazi Bay [gazetteer]; Kenya [gazetteer]; Marine; Brackish water

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Abstract
    The vertical distribution of meiofauna in the sediments of Avicennia marina, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Ceriops tagal, Rhizophora mucronata and Sonneratia alba at Gazi Bay (Kenya), is described. Seventeen taxa were observed, with highest densities in the sediments of Bruguiera, followed by Rhizophora, Avicennia, Sonneratsia and Ceriops. Nematodes accounted for up to 95% of total densities; other common taxa were copepods, turbellarians, oligochaetes, polychaetes, ostracods and rotifers. High densities occurred to about 20 cm depth in the sediment. Especially Ceriops sediments show still high densities of nematodes and copepods in the deepest layer. Particle size and oxygen conditions were major factors influencing meiobenthic distribution; Uca burrows had a major impact on distribution and abundance of meiofauna.

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