IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

What North Sea oil might cost fisheries
Johnston, R. (1977). What North Sea oil might cost fisheries, in: McIntyre, A.D. et al. (Ed.) Petroleum Hydrocarbons in the Marine Environment: Proceedings from ICES Workshop held in Aberdeen 9-12 September 1975. Rapports et Procès-Verbaux des Réunions du Conseil Permanent International pour l'Exploration de la Mer, 171: pp. 212-223
In: McIntyre, A.D.; Whittle, K.J. (Ed.) (1977). Petroleum Hydrocarbons in the Marine Environment: Proceedings from ICES Workshop held in Aberdeen 9-12 September 1975. Rapports et Procès-Verbaux des Réunions du Conseil Permanent International pour l'Exploration de la Mer, 171. Conseil International pour l'Exploration de la Mer: Copenhagen. 7-230 pp., more
In: Rapports et Procès-Verbaux des Réunions du Conseil Permanent International pour l'Exploration de la Mer. Conseil Permanent International pour l'Exploration de la Mer: Copenhague. ISSN 0074-4336, more

Also published as
  • Johnston, R. (1977). What North Sea oil might cost fisheries. Rapp. et Proc.-Verb. Cons. Int. Explor. Mer 171: 212-223, more

Available in  Author 

Keywords
    Fishery resources; Oil pollution; Marine

Author  Top 
  • Johnston, R.

Abstract
    There is an urgent need for a reasoned assessment of the impact of oil and oil-related developments on the fisheries of the North Sea. The available information is inadequate for a valid simulation and instead a number of theoretical relationships are assumed between fish production and its underlying food web. On this basis, taking account of the more important proven or probable modes of action of North Sea oil, a tentative appraisal is made of the possible loss as equivalent fish resulting from oil spillages of various magnitudes and probabilities. The physical encumbrance of soil-related developments on fishing is then assessed. A third factor is natural gas exploitation and its attendant risks and interferences. Losses reckoned as fish production or its approximate cash equivalent are shown to be small even for a catastrophic oil spill. Physical obstruction to fishing might be construed as a more serious interference.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author