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Estimating bottlenose dolphin population parameters from individual identification and capture-release techniques
Wells, R.S.; Scott, M.D. (1990). Estimating bottlenose dolphin population parameters from individual identification and capture-release techniques, in: Hammond, P.S. et al. (Ed.) Individual recognition of cetaceans: use of photo-identification and other techniques to estimate population parameters. Incorporating the Proceedings of the symposium and workshop on individual recognition and the estimation of cetacean population parameters. Report of the International Whaling Commission, Spec. Issue (12): pp. 407-415
In: Hammond, P.S. et al. (Ed.) (1990). Individual recognition of cetaceans: use of photo-identification and other techniques to estimate population parameters. Incorporating the Proceedings of the symposium and workshop on individual recognition and the estimation of cetacean population parameters. Report of the International Whaling Commission, Spec. Issue (12). International Whaling Commission: Cambridge. ISBN 0-906975-23-9. 440 pp., more
In: Report of the International Whaling Commission. International Whaling Commission: Cambridge. ISSN 0143-8700, more

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Keywords
    Population characteristics; Population number; Stock identification; Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821) [WoRMS]; ASW, USA, Florida [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Wells, R.S.
  • Scott, M.D.

Abstract
    Field studies begun in 1970 and continuing to date have identified at least 3 adjacent resident populations (or communities) of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus ) along the central west coast of Florida. Photo-identification, mark-recapture techniques, behavioral observations, radio-tracking and brief captures for biological sampling were used to examine the structure and dynamics of these populations. Although the populations are relatively discrete in terms of ranges and associations, electrophoretic analyses of blood samples indicate that genetic exchange occurs between populations. Most field effort has concentrated on the Sarasota dolphin population. Most of its members are identifiable from natural marks or tagging efforts over the last 20 years. The long time span of the study and the high proportion of identifiable individuals has allowed to estimate vital rates for this population. An annual recruitment rate to age 1 of 0.048 was countered by a minimum mortality rate of 0.010 and a mean annual loss rate from other causes of 0.029. Immigration was infrequent, with a mean annual rate about 0.02. The mean fecundity rate was 0.144.

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