IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Optimal uptake kinetics: physiological acclimation explains the pattern of nitrate uptake by phytoplankton in the ocean
Smith, S.L.; Yamanaka, Y.; Pahlow, M.; Oschlies, A. (2009). Optimal uptake kinetics: physiological acclimation explains the pattern of nitrate uptake by phytoplankton in the ocean. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 384: 1-12. https://hdl.handle.net/10.3354/meps08022
In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. Inter-Research: Oldendorf/Luhe. ISSN 0171-8630, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Kinetics; Nitrates; Nitrogen; Nutrients; Phytoplankton; Uptake; Marine
Author keywords
    Nutrient uptake; Kinetics; Phytoplankton; Nitrogen; Nitrate;Biogeochemical model

Authors  Top 
  • Smith, S.L.
  • Yamanaka, Y.
  • Pahlow, M.
  • Oschlies, A.

Abstract
    Phytoplankton supply the base of the marine food web and drive the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients. Over much of the ocean, their growth is limited by their uptake of nitrogen (as nitrate), which has most commonly been described by the hyperbolic Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation. However, the lack of a theory to explain variations in MM constants has hindered our ability to predict the response of marine ecosystems to changes in environmental conditions. The MM equation fits data from short-term experiments well, but does not agree with steady-state experiments over wide ranges of nutrient concentrations. In contrast, the recently developed optimal uptake kinetics (OU) does agree with the latter and can also describe the observed pattern of MM half-saturation constants from field. experiments. OU kinetics explains the observed pattern of N uptake as the result of a general physiological trade-off between nutrient uptake capacity and affinity. The existence of a general trade-off would imply a relatively high degree of predictability in the response of nutrient uptake to changing nutrient concentrations and thus provide a basis for predicting effects of climate change on marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors