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Current status of using beaks to identify Cephalopods: III International Workshop and training course on Cephalopod beaks, Faial, Azores, April 2007
Xavier, J.; Clarke, M.R.; Magalhães, M.C.; Stowasser, G.; Blanco, C.; Cherel, Y. (2007). Current status of using beaks to identify Cephalopods: III International Workshop and training course on Cephalopod beaks, Faial, Azores, April 2007. Arquipélago (Ciénc. Biol. Mar./Life Mar. Sci.) 24: 41-48
In: Arquipélago. Ciências biológicas e marinhas/Life and marine sciences. University of the Azores: Azores. ISSN 0873-4704, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Xavier, J.
  • Clarke, M.R.
  • Magalhães, M.C.
  • Stowasser, G.
  • Blanco, C.
  • Cherel, Y.

Abstract
    The identification of cephalopods using their beaks is still a difficult technique. To increase our knowledge of this technique and stimulate a new generation of beak experts, the III International beak workshop and training course was organized in Faial, Azores Islands in 2007. We briefly review the activities of the workshop, including the identification procedure of lower beaks of cephalopods from predators with emphasis on cetaceans, seals, fish and seabirds; provision of basic knowledge to young researchers interested in the study area; identification of recent developments in beak research; and discussion of the main problematic issues. The families that need particular attention are Brachioteuthidae, Chiroteuthidae, Cranchiidae, Cycloteuthidae, Mastigoteuthidae, Octopoteuthidae, Promachoteuthidae, Onychoteuthidae (particularly the genus Walvisteuthis), Mastigoteuthidae and Cirroteuthidae. The stable isotopic signature of beaks is capable of revealing new trophic relationships and migrations. Future work should focus on: a) obtaining more cephalopod material from research cruises; b) promoting a close and continuous collaboration between beak experts and cephalopod taxonomists and; c) developing new, and updated, beak guides.

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