Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

In:

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
report an error in this recordbasket (1): add | show Printer-friendly version

one publication added to basket [141840]
Effect of bottom stress formulation on modelled flow and turbidity maxima in cross-sections of tide-dominated estuaries
Schramkowski, G.; de Swart, H.E.; Schuttelaars, H.M. (2009). Effect of bottom stress formulation on modelled flow and turbidity maxima in cross-sections of tide-dominated estuaries. Ocean Dynamics Online first: [1-14]
In: Ocean Dynamics. Springer-Verlag: Berlin. ISSN 1616-7341, more
Peer reviewed article

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Estuaries; Sediment transport; Turbidity; Marine; Brackish water
Author keywords
    Morphodynamic equilibrium

Authors  Top 
  • Schramkowski, G., more
  • de Swart, H.E.
  • Schuttelaars, H.M., more

Abstract
    A three-dimensional numerical model with a prognostic salinity field is used to investigate the effect of a partial slip bottom boundary condition on lateral flow and sediment distribution in a transect of a tidally dominated channel. The transect has a symmetrical Gaussian cross-channel bottom profile. For a deep, well-mixed, tidally dominated channel, partial slip decreases the relative importance of Coriolis deflection on the generation of cross-channel flow patterns. This has profound implications for the lateral distribution of residual salinity that drives the cross-channel residual circulation pattern. Transverse sediment transport, however, is always found to be governed by a balance between advection of residual sediment concentration by residual lateral flow on the one hand and cross-channel diffusion on the other hand. Hence, the changes in the cross-channel distribution of residual salinity modify the lateral sediment distribution. For no slip, a single turbidity maximum occurs. In contrast, partial slip gives a gradual transition to a symmetrical density distribution with a turbidity maximum near each bank. For a more shallow, partially mixed tidal channel that represents the James River, a single turbidity maximum at the left bank is found irrespective of the near-bed slip condition. In this case, semi-diurnal contributions to sediment distribution and lateral flow play an important role in cross-channel sediment transport. As vertical viscosity and diffusivity are increased, a second maximum at the right bank again exists for partial slip.

 Top | Authors