IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Predators and methods of control in molluscan shelfish cultivation in North European waters
Spencer, B.E. (1992). Predators and methods of control in molluscan shelfish cultivation in North European waters, in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture and the Environment: reviews of the International Conference Aquaculture Europe '91, Dublin, Ireland, June 10-12, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 16: pp. 309-338
In: De Pauw, N.; Joyce, J. (Ed.) (1992). Aquaculture and the Environment: reviews of the International Conference Aquaculture Europe '91, Dublin, Ireland, June 10-12, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 16. European Aquaculture Society: Gent, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-10-9. 536 pp., more
In: EAS Special Publication. European Aquaculture Society, more

Available in Author 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [14632]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • Spencer, B.E.

Abstract
    Most predators of molluscan shellfish in European waters are birds, fish, crustaceans, echinoderms and molluscs. Although the number of predatory species is quite small, the abundance of individuals may often be sufficiently high to cause substantial mortalities to crops at a local or wider level. Past cultivation practices, in an unenlightened era, have sometimes compounded problems with the unintentional introduction from overseas predators along with the intended commercial crop of a"non-native" species. Perhaps the best known example of an unwanted predator is the American whelk ringle (Urosalpinx cinerea) introduced into England along with American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) many years ago. This gastropod became established in some areas of Essex and Kent and caused high mortalities of the juvenile stages of the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) in east coast fisheries. Over the past 30 years, the development of commercial hatcheries producing large quantities of juvenile bivalves has required cost-effective methods to ensure the best possible survival of their valuable crops. On-growers of hatchery seed tend to use methods which exclude rather than control predators. Crops are kept in trays or bags, or behind fenced barriers, or beneath plastic netring, usually until they are of a size at which they are relatively safe from predators. Cultivators, however, who utilize natural stocks of molluscs, such as mussels and oysters, transplanted to ground plots, have of necessity to control predators such as crabs, starfish and tingles by trapping or catching them.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author