IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Aquaculture and user conflicts
O'Sullivan, A.J. (1992). Aquaculture and user conflicts, in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture and the Environment: reviews of the International Conference Aquaculture Europe '91, Dublin, Ireland, June 10-12, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 16: pp. 405-412
In: De Pauw, N.; Joyce, J. (Ed.) (1992). Aquaculture and the Environment: reviews of the International Conference Aquaculture Europe '91, Dublin, Ireland, June 10-12, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 16. European Aquaculture Society: Gent, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-10-9. 536 pp., more
In: EAS Special Publication. European Aquaculture Society, more

Available in Author 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [14637]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • O'Sullivan, A.J.

Abstract
    Rapid growth of aquaculture in a number of European countries has led to the emergence of conflicts between the newly developing industry and traditional users of the coast and inland waters such as fin and shell fisheries, rod angling, and other leisure activities. Conflicts have arisen as a result of: a) organic pollution of some sheltered marine inlets and eutrophication of some lakes; b) potentially toxic effects of chemicals used to prevent or control diseases in caged fish; c) the visual impact of floating cages, longlines, rafts, and on-shore structures, particularly in areas of high scenic value; d) competition for water space between aquaculture and leisure pursuits; e) the perceived loss of wilderness quality in certain remote areas as a consequence of the infrastructure required by fish farming; f) potential danger to wildstock fish populations as a result of interbreeding with fish which have escaped from farms; g) the potential impact on predator populations of the need to control predators or frighten them away from aquaculture installations. Examples from Ireland are used to illustrate such conflicts. In Ireland the emergence of these issues has contributed to a change in the attitude of coastal communities towards the acceptability of fish farms. A significant contributory factor also appears to have been the lack of a coherent government policy, particularly in the area of coastal resources management. In order to redress the situation a primary task must be to develop and implement policies based on a comprehensive and integrated approach to the management of coastal resources. Such policies should recognize not only the development opportunities presented by coastal resources but the constraints governed by ecological realities. Communities living in coastal areas must be given a central role in the formulation and implementation of appropriate policies particular to each region.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author