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An economic assessment of aquaculture in Ireland
O'Connor, R.; Whelan, B.J. (1992). An economic assessment of aquaculture in Ireland, in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture and the Environment: reviews of the International Conference Aquaculture Europe '91, Dublin, Ireland, June 10-12, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 16: pp. 497-516
In: De Pauw, N.; Joyce, J. (Ed.) (1992). Aquaculture and the Environment: reviews of the International Conference Aquaculture Europe '91, Dublin, Ireland, June 10-12, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 16. European Aquaculture Society: Gent, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-10-9. 536 pp., more
In: EAS Special Publication. European Aquaculture Society, more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [14650]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • O'Connor, R.
  • Whelan, B.J.

Abstract
    A survey of all the aquaculture enterprises in the State was carried out in 1991. This enquiry collected information on the level of stocks sales, costs of production, capital and labour employed, diseases, etc. Salmon and trout sales less purchases of broodstock fish were IR£22.5 million. The value of stocks increased by IR£6.3 million between the beginning and end of the year so that the value of total output was IR£28.8 million. Total expenses other than paid labour and depreciation were IR£24.5 million giving a gross value added by the industry of IR£4.3 million. Paid labour costs were IR£:7 million so that gross income for the industry was negative. Trout farming however showed a profit of IR£1.6 million after allowing for depreciation. Of the 16 salmon farms in the sample, four made sizeable profits. Eight broke even if depreciation was not charged. Four farms were responsible for the large losses. In addition to the low prices for fish the problems on the loss making farms appeared to be large fish losses either from escapees or disease and high labour costs. The salmon industry is at the bottom of the business cycle and prices seem certain to recover in the coming years. A substantial market for these products has now been established and in the long run it will have to be supplied at economic prices. Shellfish output was estimated at IR£6.8 million. Costs including labour and depreciation were IR£4.9 million giving a return to unpaid labour of IR£1.9 million. The most profitable enterprises were bottom mussels and native oysters. Rope mussels showed a lower but still positive return. Returns from Pacific oysters and other species such as clams, scallops etc. were less favourable. The survey is likely to underestimate somewhat the ultimate profitability of many shellfish enterprises which are at an early stage of development and had no sales in 1990.

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