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Mussel farming in New Zealand; how much more can it grow?
Hickman, R.W. (1989). Mussel farming in New Zealand; how much more can it grow?, in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. pp. 321-325
In: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) (1989). Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. European Aquaculture Society: Bredene, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-03-6. 1-592 pp., more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

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  • Hickman, R.W.

Abstract
    Mussel farming developed in New Zealand, following the collapse of wild dredge fisheries, in the late 1960's. Farming was based on the green-lipped mussel Perna canaliculus, which had a rapid growth rate, adequate seed supplies and good market potential. Other factors favouring the rapid expansion of the farming industry were the efficiency of the longline system and the advantageous environmental conditions of the waters around the New Zealand coastline. Marketing was the principal constraint on industry development. Production increased from 300ton 1977 to over 10 000ton present, with mussel exports currently worth over NZ$10 million. Full development of the farms already established could increase the annual production to around 48 000t. Sufficient seed supplies, sufficient nutrients to sustain production, and scope for increased exports will probably be the major constraints on achieving this degree of expansion.

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