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Effects of manipulation of a lotic periphyton community on abundance, diet, and behaviour of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) (Walbaum 1792) (Abstract)
Parkyn, D.C.; Austin, A.P. (1989). Effects of manipulation of a lotic periphyton community on abundance, diet, and behaviour of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) (Walbaum 1792) (Abstract), in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. pp. 687
In: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) (1989). Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. European Aquaculture Society: Bredene, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-03-6. 1-592 pp., more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Parkyn, D.C.
  • Austin, A.P.

Abstract
    Juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) populations in Goldstream River, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, were studied during a 10 week period from June to September 1986. Changes in abundance of fish, food habits, and behavior were assessed relative to three control (neutral manipulatlon) pools before and after a 2-fold enhancement of periphyton for three pools, and before and after a total removal of all periphyton in another three pools. Fish populations in all treatments increased slightly prior to manipulation. In the post-manipulatlon period, however, enhanced pools held significantly more salmon than control pools. In contrast, pools with reduced periphyton held significantly fewer salmon than controls. Control populations remained relatively constant over the course of the experiment. Intraspecific aggression was highest in the enhanced treatment, and lowest in the reduced treatment. Contrary to some previous studies, stomach-content analysis and behavioral observation of feeding by young salmon support the hypothesis that benthic productivity is a major component of the diet of these juvenile coho salmon. The results of this experiment suggest a potential use of periphyton as a tool for increasing the holding capacity of natural stream pools.

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