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Possible use of rotifers resting eggs and preserved live rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) in aquaculture
Lubzens, E. (1989). Possible use of rotifers resting eggs and preserved live rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) in aquaculture, in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. pp. 741-750
In: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) (1989). Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. European Aquaculture Society: Bredene, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-03-6. 1-592 pp., more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

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  • Lubzens, E.

Abstract
    The euryhaline rotifer Brachionus plicatilis serves as the first, and in many cases the only food offered to marine fish larvae in the first days of their life. Today the supply of the enormous numbers of rotifers required in mariculture is met by continuous mass cultures. The use of preserved rotifers may partially overrome the problems inherent to mass culturing of this live food and ensure a better coordination between supply and demand. In the present paper, the possible use of rotifer resting eggs and cold storage of live animals for freshwater and marine aquaculture are examined. The reproductive rate and the production of males and resting eggs has been determined in 36 clones isolated from single resting eggs produced by a parent clone. It was found that 11 of the clones produced only females, 16 produced females and males, and only 10 clones produced females, males and resting eggs. Ouantitative estimation of resting-egg production was tested in live clones and shows large variation between and within the clones. Results indicate that production of resting eggs is probably genetically determined. Evaluation of environmental and internal factors that may affect operation costs of resting egg production leads to an estimated price of 20- to 30-fold higher than that of live rotifers. Live rotifers were found to survive well (over 65%) during extended periods at 4°C. This method could be useful not only in daily management in the hatchery but would also facilitate wider distribution of rotifers from the culture locations to small-scale fish growers. This method of storage could be applied to asexually and sexually reproducing strains or clones.

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