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Fecal bacterial flora of rainbow trout under antibiotic treatment: effect of the number of pyloric caeca and the lipid content of food
Lésel, R.; de la Noüe, J.; Choubert, G. (1989). Fecal bacterial flora of rainbow trout under antibiotic treatment: effect of the number of pyloric caeca and the lipid content of food, in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. pp. 897-903
In: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) (1989). Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. European Aquaculture Society: Bredene, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-03-6. 1-592 pp., more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Lésel, R.
  • de la Noüe, J.
  • Choubert, G.

Abstract
    Fish are often fed antibiotics in order to eliminate the bacterial flora from the digestive tract. Due to the difficulties observed to obtain this result, we planned experiments to test the effect of an antibiotic mixture on the digestive bacterial populations in fish. This study describes the effect of the combination gentamicin + flumequin distributed in two different diets, one lipid-poor and one lipid-rich. The assays were performed on trout families characterized by different numbers of pyloric caeca. In the most favourable case, antibiotic feeding induced a decrease of 102 of the fecal flora. As soon as feeding with antibiotic-supplemented pellets was stopped, fecal flora regained its initial level. Before and after treatment, four or five taxa were identified in feces, but only one to three when fish were fed supplemented pellets. The lipid content did not seem to have a significant influence over the bacterial flora. The development of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains in trout, having a high number of pyloric caeca and submitted to antibiotic treatment, suggested that in such families bacteria can remain in the digestive tract and become adapted. In no case, could the antibiotic treatment ensure the complete elimination of the flora.

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